Law of Attraction Forum

Law of Attraction for Abundance => Law of Attraction for Abundance => Topic started by: siamesegirl on April 19, 2018, 12:10:12 PM

Title: The right attitude towards gratitude
Post by: siamesegirl on April 19, 2018, 12:10:12 PM
How do we get this right? What's the difference between gratitude, thankfulness, feeling blessed? Isn't there a subtle difference? How should we guard against being grateful for crumbs when we know we deserve better? I'm thinking of getting a menial job when you have been in more high flying ones just to pay some of the bills, or being grateful that a rude and disrespectful partner or ex has been pleasant for once, i.e. breadcrumbs.

What do you think?
Title: Re: The right attitude towards gratitude
Post by: Superman on April 19, 2018, 01:22:58 PM
The difference between gratitude, thankfulness, feeling blessed?
Just different words. Those are the same energy and those manifest the same "thing".

When you're grateful or any other word above: you generate very pure and powerful energy! It is what manifests greatness in your life. It is what destroys the negative.
The object of your gratitude or thankfulness or feeling blessed is not really important. You can be grateful even for this message or a smile or really ANYTHING. If the feeling is geniune it will create positive results. The more intense and the more you persevere in that kind of pure feelings the more greatness and the more joy you attract.
Again: the person or the event or the object or situation you're gretaful for is irevelant. Whats important is what you generate as energy... it is what changes your experience. It puts you on another level. This is the reason I created my game:  http://www.powerlawofattraction.com/forum/index.php?topic=21412.0 (http://www.powerlawofattraction.com/forum/index.php?topic=21412.0)
PS: you don't even need a reason to generate that energy within you. You can do it just because you want it.

Title: Re: The right attitude towards gratitude
Post by: yesican on April 21, 2018, 11:35:08 AM
How should we guard against being grateful for crumbs when we know we deserve better?

maybe this helps. It is a quote by Louise Hay. She wrote a lot about gratitudue and the power of being thankful for everything. According to her you open up for more by being thankful for what is right now. It is not about settling for less

If you like your job but feel that you’re not getting paid enough, then bless your current salary with love. Expressing gratitude for what you have now enables your income to grow. And please, absolutely no more complaining about the job or your co-workers. Your consciousness put you where you are now. Your changing consciousness can lift to you a better position.


if you want the link just let me know. I need to look for it
Title: Re: The right attitude towards gratitude
Post by: Demon on April 21, 2018, 12:39:03 PM
I read a story on same topic nd think to share :


"Long ago I heard a story about a bird who lived in the desert, very sick, no feathers, nothing to eat and drink, no shelter to live and kept on cursing his life day and night.

One day an Angel was crossing from that desert, bird stopped the Angel and inquired ” where are you going?” Angel replied” I am going to meet God”. So bird asked angel ‘please ask God when my suffering will come to an end?’ Angel said” sure, I will and bid a good bye to bird. Angel reached God’s place and shared the message of bird to Him. Angel told Him how pathetic the condition of bird is and inquired when the suffering of the bird will going to end ? God replied ‘for the next seven life times the bird has to suffer like this, no happiness till then’. Angel said when bird will hear this he will get disheartened could You suggest any solution for this.

God replied tell him to recite this mantra ‘ Thank you God for everything’. Angel met the bird again and delivered the message of God to the bird.
After seven days the Angel was passing again from the same path and saw that bird was so happy, feathers grew up on his body, a small plant grew up in the desert area, a small pond of water was also there, the bird was singing and dancing cheerfully. Angel was astonished how it happened, God told for seven life times there is no happiness for the bird for next seven life times, with this question in mind He went to visit God. Angel asked his query then God replied yes it was true there was no happiness for the bird for seven life time but because the bird was reciting the mantra’ Thank you God for everything’ in every situation. When bird fell down on the hot sand it said thank you God for everything, when it could not fly it said thank you God for everything, so whatever the situation may be the bird kept on repeating Thank you God for everything and therefore the seven life times karma got dissolved in seven days."


it is not merely about reciting a mantra but feeling the grattitute the blessing for things u hv already. whn u do it right not just repeating the words like a parrot it will shift u to different energy zones.  if u hv pain in one arm but u r feeling blessed to hv ur rest of body in perfect condition nd perfectly healthy arm pain vl not bother u in any way. in same manner it vl apply for relationships, job, business nd stuffs. A.T UCLA’s Mindfulness Awareness Research Center, regularly expressing gratitude literally changes the molecular structure of the brain, keeps the gray matter functioning nd makes us healthier and happier.
When you feel joy the central nervous system is affected. u r more peaceful, less reactive nd less resistant. nd gratitude is the most effective practice for stimulating feelings of happiness. 
Title: Re: The right attitude towards gratitude
Post by: Superman on April 21, 2018, 01:45:18 PM
Once upon a time there was a king who worried day and night about what tomorrow might bring. He feared he would lose his power, his wife might not love him, his subjects would become disloyal. He could not sleep for all his worries about the future.

One day the king noticed a poor cobbler hard at work in the marketplace. The fellow wore ragged clothes and was thin as a blade of grass, but his smile was bright as the moon. Surely this man must worry; how could he smile so brightly? The king decided to find out.

The next day the king dressed in rags and walked to the market just as the cobbler was finishing his work. Secretly he followed the cobbler and watched him buy a loaf of bread before returning to his tumbledown hut. When the cobbler was inside, the king knocked upon the door.

When the cobbler answered, the king said, "Please sir, can you spare some food for a beggar?"

"Of course," the cobbler said.

As they were eating, the king asked, "Why are you so happy?"

"Today I earned enough money fixing shoes to buy this loaf of bread!"

"But what if you don't earn enough for food tomorrow?" the king asked.

"I have faith," the cobbler answered. "All will be well."

This impressed the king, and when he left, he wondered what would happen if the cobbler could not earn his bread. Surely then he would not have such faith.

The king decided to test the cobbler.

The next morning in the marketplace, the cobbler saw a new sign in the marketplace. The king had decreed no one was permitted to repair shoes. From this day on, whenever someone's shoes wore out, that person must buy a new pair.

The cobbler was puzzled, but he did not despair. When he saw an old woman trying to pull a heavy bucket of water from the well, he walked over to help and carried her bucket home for her. "Thank you son," she said, and she rewarded him with a coin. That gave the cobbler an idea, and so he spent all day carrying water for people until he had enough money to purchase a bowl of soup.

That evening the king once again dressed in rags and hurried to the cobbler's hut. "Surely he'll be weeping tonight," the king said, but through the window he saw the cobbler sipping soup and smiling. The king knocked. "I came to see if you were all right," he said, "for I saw the new decree. How on earth did you pay for this soup since you could not fix shoes?"

"I carried water," the cobbler said. "Please, come in and share my soup. You look hungry."

"But what will you do tomorrow?" the king asked. How could this man have such faith?

"I have faith," the cobbler said. "All will be well."

The next day the cobbler walked to the well, but now there was a new decree: "It is illegal to carry water for others," said a brand-new sign.

The cobbler shook his head, but when he saw a man carrying a load of wood on his back, his face lit up, and so all day he carried wood for people until he had earned enough money to buy a chicken.

When the king disguised as the beggar came to the hut again that night, he was dumbfounded to see the cobbler happily eating. "How did you pay for a chicken?" he asked.

"I carried wood!" the cobbler said. "Come, share this chicken with me."

Now the king realized he would have to be far cleverer than he had been. "When he cannot eat, he will lose his faith," the king said to himself.

And the next morning when the cobbler joined the other wood carriers, one of the king's guards announced, "From now on the wood carriers will serve as palace guards. Follow me!"

Naturally the cobbler obeyed the guard. He stood all day long outside the palace dressed in his fine uniform with a silver sword at his side. When it was dark, the captain announced he was free to go home.

"And will you pay me so I might buy my evening's meal?" the cobbler asked.

"We shall pay you when you have proven yourself," the guard said. "First you must work for one month."

As the cobbler walked home, he thought and thought, and when he passed a pawnshop, he made a decision. He would sell his sword for enough money for meals for the month. When he was paid, he would purchase back the sword.

That night when the beggar knocked upon the cobbler's door, the cobbler invited him in. The king disguised as a beggar was amazed to see the table laden with a feast of cheese and bread and wine. The cobbler was whittling away at a piece of wood.

"But how did you buy all this?" the beggar asked. "And what are you making?"

So the cobbler told the story of pawning his sword. "I am carving a wooden blade to take the place of the silver."

"Very clever," said the king disguised as the beggar, "but what if you need your sword?"

"I have faith. All well be well," the cobbler said.

The next day as the cobbler stood guard, the king's soldiers brought a thief to the gates. "This man has stolen from the market," the soldiers said to the cobbler. "The king orders you to cut off his head!"

The thief threw himself on his knees before the cobbler. "Please spare me, my family was starving," he begged.

The cobbler stood tall and thought long and hard. If he pulled out his wooden sword, both he and the thief would be beheaded.

At last he said a silent prayer and looked at the gathered crowd. Placing a hand on the hilt of his sword, he said, "If this man is guilty, God grant me the strength to cut off his head. But if he is innocent, let God transform the blade of my sword to wood."

And he withdrew his sword.

The crowd gasped at the sight of the wooden sword and cried, "A miracle!"

The king approached the cobbler and asked, "Do you know who I am?"

"Of course," the cobbler said, "you are the king."

The king shook his head and said, "I am the beggar who came to your door," and then he told the cobbler of his tests.

"Your faith has driven away my fears about the future," the king said, and he announced the cobbler would become his most trusted adviser.

Title: Re: The right attitude towards gratitude
Post by: SharrySteve1 on July 06, 2019, 04:28:29 PM
Gratitude is all about first recognising a gift or benefit. Once you realise that you have been given relief, benefit or gift, the net logical step is thankfulness. Thankfulness is coming to the conclusion that this particular gift/relief was outside of yourself as it was created by someone else, other entity, nature, God, etc.

1) Grateful is recognising the gift
2) Thankfulness is directed at the benefactor. It is all about acknowledging the creator of the gift.

So, it will always starts from being grateful (for benefit) to being thankful (directed toward the benefactor)

Title: Re: The right attitude towards gratitude
Post by: SharrySteve1 on July 08, 2019, 04:31:01 AM
Check out this article on gratitude is more powerful than happiness (https://www.pakrush.com/2018/06/gratitude-and-happiness-what-is-more-powerful.html) and you will know the key difference why thankfulness is the most powerful emotion you have at your disposal.

Most people worry about being happy, when in reality, being happy is just a result or an effect. Gratitude is a cause. A causes always produces an effect. Happiness (effect) doesn't have power to produce further happiness.
Title: Re: The right attitude towards gratitude
Post by: Jason Change on August 20, 2019, 10:15:52 AM
hello,

gratitude, thankfulness, fulfillment, joy, love, freedom all feel very similar in vibration.  it's not that important to be able to discern between them but when you have practied long enough, you will know which is which.   they all lead to things you want.  law of attraction does not work unless you are in this flow state of positive emotion.  you can think about something all you want but without the accompanying strong emotion, it will not be attracted.  learning to being grateful for "crumbs" allows you to practice the vibration of gratitude.  when you are able to be grateful or find things about a certain situation that is not pleasing that DO please you, you are powerfully starting to practice this higher vibrational energy and after you are able to hold that vibration about whatever subjecft (i.e. job or relationship) then that situation will start to improve or another one that is vibrating much more in sync with your new higher vibration, will come to you.  people think that when you give gratitude for your "crumbs" that the universe thinks you are ok with just having crumbs.  this is not the case in my experience.  the universe will start to bring you more and more things to be grateful for.  hope this helps!

namaste, love and light


How do we get this right? What's the difference between gratitude, thankfulness, feeling blessed? Isn't there a subtle difference? How should we guard against being grateful for crumbs when we know we deserve better? I'm thinking of getting a menial job when you have been in more high flying ones just to pay some of the bills, or being grateful that a rude and disrespectful partner or ex has been pleasant for once, i.e. breadcrumbs.

What do you think?
Title: Re: The right attitude towards gratitude
Post by: Alexbally on August 20, 2019, 10:59:02 AM
I think that with the loose examples you gave here SG, it is actually the overriding sense of hope and optimism that makes some grateful for breadcrumbs. These people are reactive, not proactive.

You....the conscious mind that is you, navigates by using sensory perception. The subconscious mind is exactly the same except that the SM does not have the ability of critical thinking that the CM has, allowing for the SM to treat the imagined just the same as reality.
We all have mental chatter inside our heads all day long. This is the CM interpreting and then communicating back about whatever you have sensed. The SM has this facility too except that it communicates in the language of emotional feedback, not mental chatter.
You can consciously think about an emotion but you cannot fake feeling it.

Good attitude is nice but it is no substitute for aptitude.
Title: Re: The right attitude towards gratitude
Post by: manifestationmagical on August 30, 2019, 01:01:47 PM
Once upon a time there was a king who worried day and night about what tomorrow might bring. He feared he would lose his power, his wife might not love him, his subjects would become disloyal. He could not sleep for all his worries about the future.

One day the king noticed a poor cobbler hard at work in the marketplace. The fellow wore ragged clothes and was thin as a blade of grass, but his smile was bright as the moon. Surely this man must worry; how could he smile so brightly? The king decided to find out.

The next day the king dressed in rags and walked to the market just as the cobbler was finishing his work. Secretly he followed the cobbler and watched him buy a loaf of bread before returning to his tumbledown hut. When the cobbler was inside, the king knocked upon the door.

When the cobbler answered, the king said, "Please sir, can you spare some food for a beggar?"

"Of course," the cobbler said.

As they were eating, the king asked, "Why are you so happy?"

"Today I earned enough money fixing shoes to buy this loaf of bread!"

"But what if you don't earn enough for food tomorrow?" the king asked.

"I have faith," the cobbler answered. "All will be well."

This impressed the king, and when he left, he wondered what would happen if the cobbler could not earn his bread. Surely then he would not have such faith.

The king decided to test the cobbler.

The next morning in the marketplace, the cobbler saw a new sign in the marketplace. The king had decreed no one was permitted to repair shoes. From this day on, whenever someone's shoes wore out, that person must buy a new pair.

The cobbler was puzzled, but he did not despair. When he saw an old woman trying to pull a heavy bucket of water from the well, he walked over to help and carried her bucket home for her. "Thank you son," she said, and she rewarded him with a coin. That gave the cobbler an idea, and so he spent all day carrying water for people until he had enough money to purchase a bowl of soup.

That evening the king once again dressed in rags and hurried to the cobbler's hut. "Surely he'll be weeping tonight," the king said, but through the window he saw the cobbler sipping soup and smiling. The king knocked. "I came to see if you were all right," he said, "for I saw the new decree. How on earth did you pay for this soup since you could not fix shoes?"

"I carried water," the cobbler said. "Please, come in and share my soup. You look hungry."

"But what will you do tomorrow?" the king asked. How could this man have such faith?

"I have faith," the cobbler said. "All will be well."

The next day the cobbler walked to the well, but now there was a new decree: "It is illegal to carry water for others," said a brand-new sign.

The cobbler shook his head, but when he saw a man carrying a load of wood on his back, his face lit up, and so all day he carried wood for people until he had earned enough money to buy a chicken.

When the king disguised as the beggar came to the hut again that night, he was dumbfounded to see the cobbler happily eating. "How did you pay for a chicken?" he asked.

"I carried wood!" the cobbler said. "Come, share this chicken with me."

Now the king realized he would have to be far cleverer than he had been. "When he cannot eat, he will lose his faith," the king said to himself.

And the next morning when the cobbler joined the other wood carriers, one of the king's guards announced, "From now on the wood carriers will serve as palace guards. Follow me!"

Naturally the cobbler obeyed the guard. He stood all day long outside the palace dressed in his fine uniform with a silver sword at his side. When it was dark, the captain announced he was free to go home.

"And will you pay me so I might buy my evening's meal?" the cobbler asked.

"We shall pay you when you have proven yourself," the guard said. "First you must work for one month."

As the cobbler walked home, he thought and thought, and when he passed a pawnshop, he made a decision. He would sell his sword for enough money for meals for the month. When he was paid, he would purchase back the sword.

That night when the beggar knocked upon the cobbler's door, the cobbler invited him in. The king disguised as a beggar was amazed to see the table laden with a feast of cheese and bread and wine. The cobbler was whittling away at a piece of wood.

"But how did you buy all this?" the beggar asked. "And what are you making?"

So the cobbler told the story of pawning his sword. "I am carving a wooden blade to take the place of the silver."

"Very clever," said the king disguised as the beggar, "but what if you need your sword?"

"I have faith. All well be well," the cobbler said.

The next day as the cobbler stood guard, the king's soldiers brought a thief to the gates. "This man has stolen from the market," the soldiers said to the cobbler. "The king orders you to cut off his head!"

The thief threw himself on his knees before the cobbler. "Please spare me, my family was starving," he begged.

The cobbler stood tall and thought long and hard. If he pulled out his wooden sword, both he and the thief would be beheaded.

At last he said a silent prayer and looked at the gathered crowd. Placing a hand on the hilt of his sword, he said, "If this man is guilty, God grant me the strength to cut off his head. But if he is innocent, let God transform the blade of my sword to wood."

And he withdrew his sword.

The crowd gasped at the sight of the wooden sword and cried, "A miracle!"

The king approached the cobbler and asked, "Do you know who I am?"

"Of course," the cobbler said, "you are the king."

The king shook his head and said, "I am the beggar who came to your door," and then he told the cobbler of his tests.

"Your faith has driven away my fears about the future," the king said, and he announced the cobbler would become his most trusted adviser.


Awesome! story it taught me a great lesson. I am amazed.
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